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Pain Management Services

We have a new dedicated pain management suite and can offer ultrasound guided or X-Ray guided injections for major joints or particularly for patients with acute spinal pain or sciatica. 

The service is provided by consultant anaesthetists or radiologists and you are first seen to assess whether a procedure might be helpful for you.  Usually it is necessary to have an MRI scan before this point.

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The anaesthetist will advise whether you may benefit from a change in medication or whether or not a guided steroid injection may be appropriate.

Many patients find benefit from this in the acute stages of a disc protrusion, but the potential benefits will be discussed with you so that you can make an informed decision.

Facet Joints

Facet joints allow movement and stabilise the spine. Wear and tear, inflammation and injury to the facet joints may cause pain in some people. A facet joint procedure is an injection around or into the small joints that link the bones of the spine together. It is used for localised spinal pain where simpler measures have not helped. Several injections to different facet joints may be needed depending on the site of pain.

 The injection provides information to the consultant regarding the origin of your pain.

It can help your pain by reducing some of the pain signals from the joint and although pain relief may be short-lived, some people can get significant and long-lasting pain relief from these injections. The injection contains local anaesthetic often with a small amount of steroid. The injection is usually undertaken alongside other treatments such as physiotherapy

Epidural Injection

An epidural steroid injection involves injecting a steroid into the epidural space. This is a space that surrounds the spinal cord. Local anaesthetic, with the steroid will bathe the nerve roots which send pain signals to the brain. Epidural injections can be given anywhere along the length of the spine. This may be in the neck (cervical), between the shoulder blades/back of chest (thoracic), lower back (lumbar) or tailbone (caudal). Low dose X-Rays are used for the precise siting of these injections.

Nerve Root Block/Dorsal Root Ganglion Block / Transforaminal Epidural

A nerve root block is an injection of local anaesthetic and steroid around the dorsal root ganglion. The ganglion looks like a small swelling on the nerve that joins the spinal cord; this ganglion contains nerves that carry sensation. The sensory nerves enter through a hole referred to as the intervertebral foramen, the procedure is therefore, sometimes referred to as a transforaminal epidural because local anaesthetic and steroid may spread to the epidural space when injection is undertaken.

Nerve Root blocks are used mainly for localised radiating pain such as sciatic leg or arm pain where simpler measures have not helped, usually in the lumbar region. It may help your pain by reducing some of the pain signals.

 Pain relief can be short-lived although some people can get significant and lasting pain relief from these injections, it may not be a cure. The injection contains local anaesthetic often with a small amount of steroid. The injection is usually undertaken alongside other treatments such as physiotherapy.

Sacroiliac joint injection

A sacroiliac joint injection is an injection into a joint at the bottom of the spine where it joins the pelvis known as the sacroiliac joint. The sacroiliac joints allow movement and stabilise the spine. Wear and tear, inflammation and injury may cause pain in some people. 

 Sacroiliac joint injections may be used to diagnose and treat certain types of back pain. They are used for localised pain where simpler measures have not helped. They may help your pain by reducing some of the pain signals from the joint.

 Pain relief is usually short-lived though some people can get significant and lasting pain relief from these injections but it may not be a cure. The injection contains local anaesthetic often with a small amount of steroid. The injection is usually undertaken alongside other treatments such as physiotherapy.

Piriformis injection

A Piriformis injection is administered in the buttock area. The Piriformis muscle extends from the side of the tailbone to the side of the thighbone. The muscle can become inflamed or spasm, causing pain in the buttock and thigh.

To help with pain, the muscle can be injected with a solution of local anaesthetic and steroid. The local anaesthetic causes the muscle fibres to relax and provides immediate pain relief and the steroid helps relieve inflammation to provide longer lasting pain relief.

Piriformis muscle injections are both diagnostic and therapeutic and can help your consultant to determine the cause of your back pain. The injection is usually undertaken alongside other treatments such as physiotherapy.”

As well as services such as facet joint injections for acute pain, we also offer a range of services for more chronic pain such as RF denervations, lignocaine infusions etc but your anaesthetist may be able to advise you about this.  As always, we try and keep our costs as low as possible and you will find that we are usually half to a third of the cost of other local healthcare providers.